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Where should your child be sleeping? + The Great Debate!

kairasleeping3 Where should your child be sleeping? + The Great Debate! Researchers say co-sleeping is unhealthy, then again they say a lot of things that change over time.

I have a 5-year-old girl (pictured on the right), and a 2-year-old boy. Sadly, my son still sleeps in my bed. My daughter started sleeping in her room once she started kindergarten. A conversation was brought up at school with her friends about sleeping in mommy and daddy’s bed. Guess she felt embarrassed because a few days later she was ready to leave the nest forever!

As a mother, I felt great relief and guilt at the same time. I mean, don’t get me wrong I was excited to stretch out a bit in MY SPACE but then I missed having her foot in my mouth at wee hours. Knowing that kids are only kids for 12 years outta there entire lives scare me. I hate the thought of my kids growing up too fast.

Anyway, here’s Dr. Phil’s input on co-sleeping.

Dr. Phil does not support parents and children regularly sharing a bed, which is known as co-sleeping. In his view, having children in the parental bed can be very disruptive to a healthy adult relationship, and can also cause regressive behavior on the part of the child.

If it’s difficult for your child to sleep alone, Dr. Phil suggests discussing the issue during daylight hours — not at bedtime. Establish rules, and make it clear that your bedroom is off limits for sleeping. Comfort your child by being available, but allow co-sleeping only on special circumstances (such as the occasional thunderstorm).

Get kids excited about the independence of sleeping in their own room. Make a game out of it, giving them gold stars or rewards for making progress. Start a new habit of going into your child’s room and reading a bedtime story — but do not sleep there. To help a child overcome fear of the dark, Dr. Phil suggests buying a lamp dimmer, so that with “successive approximations” — not one big leap — the child will feel more comfortable and safe. It may be difficult at first, but in a short time, children will develop their own methods of soothing themselves and feel safe, secure and comfortable under their own covers.
Source

Now here’s the pros and cons:

The Pros
1) Babies sleep longer through the night (Dr. Sears)
2) No nighttime separation anxiety (Dr. Sears, Dr. Phil)
3) Easier to breast feed at night (Dr. Sears)
4) Time to bond with baby (Dr. Sears, Dr. Phil)
5) Studies show decreased chance of SIDS (Dr. Sears, James K. McKenna, PhD)

The Cons
1) Parents can roll over on baby (AAP; CPSC)
2) Baby can fall off the bed (AAP; CPSC)
3) Baby can fall between wall and headboard (American AAP; CPSC)
4) Baby can suffocate in loose bedding (AAP; CPSC)
5) May interfere with sex life and intimacy (Dr. Phil)
6) Creates co-dependency (Dr. Schmitt M.D., Dr. Phil)
7) Does not reduce chance of SIDS (AAP; CPSC)

So where’s your munchkin sleeping tonight?


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More Cons than pro’s!

 
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